Bishop Charles E. Blake Prays Justice for Trayvon Martin

Following the tragedy of the killing of 17-year old, Trayvon Martin, Sunday, March 25th has been declared as Hoodie Sunday in hopes that his aggressor will be arrested and Trayvon’s murder will be brought to justice. On February 26, Trayvon Martin was going to visit his father in a gated community in Florida. He was returning from a local convenience store and was carrying a bag of skittles and a bottle of iced tea when George Zimmerman shot and killed him. American citizens everywhere have come together and voiced their concerns for the slaying of this young Black high school student, who was falsely identified as a criminal by Zimmerman due to racial profiling. No arrests have been made, as Zimmerman, pleads self-defense as his alibi. However, people all over America are standing up for Trayvon, who was completely unarmed at the time of his shooting.

In both West Angeles’ 8AM and 11AM services, Presiding Bishop Charles E. Blake has released a statement: “We stand in sympathy and concern and continue to send our prayers up for the family of Trayvon Martin. All loss of life is a tragedy and we will continue to pray for all killings that continue to go on in the nation and in the world. We will continue to pray for a full investigation and that a just outcome will prevail. May God continue to bless our nation to be a place of freedom and safety for all of its’ citizens. Remember, we are one.” We all sympathize with Martin’s family and friends, realizing that this senseless murder could have been our own son. Obama spoke out about this tragedy saying, “If I had a son, he’d look like Trayvon.”

American citizens have loudly voiced their demands for justice as people post pictures of themselves in hoodies on social networks and speak out about this injustice. Throughout this past week, the major states around America; Chicago, New Orleans, Atlanta, Washington D.C., Philadelphia, Florida, Kansas City, Los Angeles the cities have organized hoodie days. Many churches are joining in the demonstration; pastors, deacons, clergymen and congregants are wearing hoodies as a demonstration to put an end to racial profiling. Some of the services and demonstrations hand out skittles. Songs and raps have been composed in Trayvon’s memory. On March 21, New York City had a march called the “Million Hoodie March.” Martin’s parents joined this march and spoke out saying that they will not stop fighting for their son’s justice and they thanked the millions of people that came out to fight for their son. There was a march at Leimert and this Sunday on Crenshaw and Exposition there was a vigil for Trayvon Martin.

We must all stand together and know that we can make a difference. In the New York “Million Hoodie March” Trayvon’s mother, Sybrina Fulton, said, “My heart is in pain, but to see the support of all of you really makes a difference.” We must continue to pray that this tragedy will find justice and Trayvon Martin will be the final incident of racial profiling. One injustice is one too many.

Inspiring Quotes from Great Women in History Part II

M1_756X439_GREAT_WOMEN

 

“To me success means effectiveness in the world, that I am able to carry my ideas and values into the world–that I am able to change it in positive ways.”

— Maxine Hong Kingston, author of “Woman Warrior”

 

“I’ve learned that people will forget what you said, people will forget what you did, but people will never forget how you made them feel.”

— Maya Angelou, African-American poet

 

“I rejected the notion that my race or sex would bar my success in life.”

— Constance Baker Motley, first African-American woman to serve as a federal judge

 

“For what is done or learned by one class of women becomes, by virtue of their common womanhood, the property of all women.”

–  Elizabeth Blackwell, first female physician in the United States

 

“If the first woman God ever made was strong enough to turn the world upside down all alone, these together ought to be able to turn it back and get it right side up again.”

— Sojourner Truth, African-American abolitionist

 

“You may be disappointed if you fail, but you are doomed if you don’t try.”

— Beverly Sills, former American opera soprano

 

“I’m not afraid of storms, for I’m learning to sail my ship.”

— Louisa May Alcott, author of “Little Women”

 

“It is better to look ahead and prepare than to look back and regret.”

— Jackie Joyner-Kersee, first woman to win back-to-back gold medals in the Summer Olympics

 

“Make a difference about something other than yourselves.”

— Toni Morrison, author of “Beloved” and first African-American to win the Nobel Prize for Literature

 

“I think the girl who is able to earn her own living and pay her own way should be as happy as anybody on earth. The sense of independence and security is very sweet.”

— Susan B. Anthony, American suffragette and advocate of women’s rights

 

 

The Testimony of Wilma Rudolph

When Wilma Rudolph was four years old she was diagnosed with polio, which causes people to be crippled and unable to walk.  To make matters worse, her family was poor and could not afford good medical care.  She was from a large family. She was the 20th child of 22 children. Her father was a railroad porter and her mother was a maid.

Her mother decided she would do everything she could to help Wilma to walk again. The doctors told her that Wilma would never be able to walk.  That did not stop Wilma’s mother.  Every week she and Wilma took a long bus trip to a hospital to receive therapy. It didn’t help, but the doctors told Wilma’s mother that massaging her legs daily might help.  She taught the brothers and sisters how to do it, and they also rubbed Wilma’s legs four times a day.  By the time she was 8, Wilma could walk with a leg brace. After that, she used a high-topped shoe to support her foot. She played basketball with her brothers every day.

Three years later, her mother came home to find her playing basketball by herself bare-footed. She didn’t even have to use the special shoe.

A track coach encouraged Wilma to start running. She ran so well that during her senior year in high school, she qualified for the 1956 Olympics in Melbourne, Australia.  She won a bronze medal in the women’s 400-meter relay.

In 1959, she qualified for the 1960 Olympic Games in Rome by setting a world’s record in the 200-meter race. At the Olympics that year she won two gold medals; one for the 100-meter race and one for the 200-meter race. 

Then she sprained her ankle, but she ignored the pain and helped her team to win another gold medal for the 400-meter relay!

Wilma retired from running when she was 22 years old, but she went on to coach women’s track teams and encourage young people.

She thought God had a greater purpose for her than to win three gold medals so she started the Wilma Rudolph Foundation to help children learn about discipline and hard work.  She died in 1994 of brain cancer but her tenacious spirit lives on forever.

“He himself bore our sins in his body on the tree, that we might die to sin and live to righteousness.  By his wounds, you have been healed.” I Peter 2:24

Thank you Ms. Rudolph for being the living testimony that God’s report is much louder than the doctors.

Inspiring Quotes from Great Women in History Part I

“The aged women likewise, that they be in behaviour as becometh holiness, not false accusers, not given to much wine, teachers of good things; that they may teach the young women to be sober, to love their husbands, to love their children, to be discreet, chaste, keepers at home, good, obedient to their own husbands, that the word of God be not blasphemed.”  Titus 2: 3-5

During this month of Women’s history, I would like us to learn from women that have accomplished much; Women that have surpassed obstacles and came out untarnished on the other side; Women that have paved a way for the younger generation to allow their dreams to come true.  May you be inspired and encouraged to live your life to the fullest from the female ancestors that have proved your capability and influence as a woman of God.

 

“I have learned over the years that when one’s mind is made up, this diminishes fear; knowing what must be done does away with fear.”

— Rosa Parks, African-American civil rights activist

 

“Life is not easy for any of us. But what of that? We must have perseverance and above all confidence in ourselves. We must believe that we are gifted for something and that this thing must be attained.”

— Marie Curie, chemist and physicist

 

“A woman is the full circle.  Within her is the power to create, nurture, and transform.”

— Diane Mariechild, author of “Mother of Wit”

 

“The most common way people give up their power is by thinking they don’t have any.”

— Alice Walker, author of “The Color Purple”

 

“You have to imagine it possible before you can see something. You can have the evidence right in front of you, but if you can’t imagine something that has never existed before, it’s impossible.”

— Rita Dove, first African-American poet laureate of the U.S.

 

“Woman must not accept; she must challenge.

She must not be awed by that which has been built up around her;

she must reverence that woman in her which struggles for expression.”

— Margaret Sanger, founder of Planned Parenthood

 

“The best protection any woman can have…is courage.”

— Elizabeth Cady Stanton, American abolitionist

 

“Be thankful for what you have; you’ll end up having more. If you concentrate on what you don’t have, you will never, ever have enough.”

— Oprah Winfrey, first successful African-American woman in media