Bishop Blake and John Hope Bryant at the historic Mason Temple, Memphis, TN. 1-2017.

Bishop Blake Discusses Financial Literacy and a New COGIC Partnership

EXCITING NEWS! The Church of God In Christ is partnering with John Hope Bryant and OPERATION HOPE to edify the community with financial literacy, as part of the COGIC Urban Initiatives.

Presiding Bishop Charles E. Blake, Sr. dedicates the Financial Literacy Center at COGIC National Headquarters, with General Board member Bishop Brandon Porter and Operation Hope CEO John Hope Bryant.

Presiding Bishop Charles E. Blake, Sr. dedicates the Financial Literacy Center at COGIC National Headquarters, with General Board member Bishop Brandon Porter and Operation Hope CEO John Hope Bryant.

 

Since its inception, OPERATION HOPE has served more than 2.5 million individuals, teaching the building blocks of financial literacy and directing more than $1.8 billion in private capital to America’s low-wealth communities. HOPE maintains a growing army of 22,000 HOPE Corps volunteers, and currently serves more than 300 U.S. cities, as well as South Africa, Saudi Arabia, Morocco, and the United Arab Emirates. Bryant founded OPERATION HOPE immediately following the 1992 Rodney King riots.

 

The partnership between OPERATION HOPE and the Church of God In Christ will be administered through the COGIC Urban Initiatives, which will in turn empower each church to create programs which build upon the principles of financial literacy and economic development within its constituents, in order to create thriving families and communities.

 

OPERATION HOPE also operates the HOPE Inside Atlanta at Ebenezer Church, located on the campus of the King Center. Both the Reverend Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. and his father, the Reverend Martin Luther King, Sr., were focused on making free enterprise a reality for all.
Watch this inspiring conversation between our Presiding Bishop Charles E. Blake, Sr. and Operation Hope CEO and Founder John Hope Bryant in this edition of “CIVIL RIGHTS STRAIGHT TALK” below, where they discuss the power of financial literacy for the underserved, and the legacy of the Civil Rights Movement:

COGIC Urban Initiatives – The vision of COGIC Urban Initiatives is to build healthy individuals, families and communities for a successful future.  Our mission is to empower the local church to implement programs that address Education, Economic Development, Crime, Family, and Financial Literacy. The programs will result in measurable improvement in the quality of life for individuals, families and communities served by the Church of God in Christ.


Compton son John Hope Bryant is a financial literacy entrepreneur and businessman. He is the founder, chairman and CEO of the nonprofit Operation HOPE.  Bryant was appointed to the U.S. Community Development Advisory Board [10] for the Community Development Financial Institutions Fund (CDFI) at the U.S. Department of the Treasury, and as vice-chairman of the President’s Council on Financial Literacy by U.S. President George W. Bush. He continued this work under President Barack Obama as part of the U.S. President’s Advisory Council on Financial Capability (PACFC). He was appointed chairman of the new Subcommittee on the Underserved and Community Empowerment for the PACFC Bryant was selected to be a member of the Global Agenda Council for the World Economic Forum in Geneva, Switzerland. He is also a best-selling author of several titles on economics and leadership, including How the Poor Can Save Capitalism: Rebuilding the Path to the Middle Class. 

 

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10 Healthy Juicing and Smoothie Recipes for Consecration

We’re down to the last few days of the annual January Consecration, but it’s never too late to begin a healthier lifestyle. We’ve complied some popular fruit and vegetable juice and smoothie combinations to inspire you.  Try these, or create your own!

“Bless the Lord, O my soul, and forget not all his benefits” – Psalm 103(KJV)

JUICE smoothie

Creamy goodness: Banana-blueberry smoothie.

When we think of fasting, we often don’t think of juicing or smoothies as a “green meal”.   But juicing and smoothies can have many benefits.  Juices can be a great way to add nutrients to your diet, and to easily absorb vitamins.  Certain elements like ginger and pineapple can reduce inflammation, and we can also add spices such as cinnamon for added benefits and flavor.

For many, the idea of vegetable juicing may be a bit challenging, especially to beginners  who are starting a consecration for the first time.  But with a simple blender or juicer and a few of our favorite fruits, you’ll find that adding fresh juices and smoothies are a great, easy way to better health.

Below we’ve listed 10 popular juicing and smoothie combinations and recipes that taste fresh and yummy, but will offer you more nutrients and vitamins at consecration time: or any time of the year.

 

JUICING AND SMOOTHIE RECIPES

1. My Pineapple Goodness
1 large handful of fresh baby spinach

1/2 fresh pineapple

10 strawberries

1/2 cucumber

 

2. Strawberry Fields

2 Apples

2 Carrots

8 Strawberries

 

Usea combination of your favorite fruits to create your own customized juices and smoothies.

Usea combination of your favorite fruits to create your own customized juices and smoothies.

3.  Banana Blueberry Smoothie

1 banana

1 handful of blueberries

1/2 cup of orange juice

1/2 cup of pineapple juice

1 cup of unsweetened vanilla almond milk

1 handful of ice

Combine in blender and enjoy!

 

4. Wake-up

1 regular orange

2-3 skinny carrots

2 1/2 sweet potatoes

1 chunk of ginger (about an inch)

 

5. Veggie Lover

1 beet

1 very large carrot

1 bell pepper

1 apple (cored)

3 stalks of celery

3″ chunk of Daikon radish

1/2 bunch of cilantro

1/2 bunch of kale

 

 

6.  Date Fig Smoothie

5 dates, pitted and chopped

3 figs, chopped

1 cup unsweetened vanilla almond milk

1 teaspoon of cinnamon

1 handful of ice

Mix on high in blender and enjoy!

 

7. Carrot Ginger Delight

4 carrots

1 inch piece of fresh ginger

1 apple

 

8. Very Berry Apple Berry

2 cups strawberries

2 peeled oranges

1 cup rasberries

2 apples

 

9. Sweet Berry Treat

2 apples

1 pear

1 beet

1 kiwi

handful of blue berries

 

10. Good Morning Greens

Handful of Parsley

3 Leaves of Curly Kale

1 Kiwi – not too soft peeled

1 Granny Smith Apple

 

All of these ingredients can be found at your local grocery store or farmer’s market. Just have your juicer or blender ready, toss in the ingredients, add a touch of ice, and you’re ready to go!


Please consult a doctor before starting any new eating regimen.  This information is not a replacement for professional medical advice.

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TONIGHT: Join Us for a Powerful Time of Prayer

Please join the West Angeles Prayer Ministry tonight for

A SPECIAL TIME OF PRAYER

in conjunction with the Annual January Consecration

6:00 PM – 7:00 PM

At the

WEST ANGELES NORTH CAMPUS

Address: 3045 Crenshaw Blvd, Los Angeles, CA 90016

Phone: (323) 733-8300  for more information.

 Please bring a friend, and remember:

“IN THIS CHANGING WORLD, LET US HOLD ONTO OUR UNCHANGING FAITH”

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To download the 2017 Consecration Calendar and Guidelines, please

CLICK HERE.

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Elder Charles Blake II: Our Double Political Identity

Republican? Democrat? Conservative? Liberal? In this installment of The Elder’s Corner, Elder Charles Blake II discusses the dichotomy of being a Black Christian in political – and often polarized – America.

By Elder Charles Blake II

Since the November election, I’ve been in a number of places with those both inside and outside the African American community who have had much to say about the results of the 2016 Presidential election. There are some who expect me, by virtue of the fact that I am African American, to be in a state of depression because of President Donald Trump’s victory in the election. If they were a supporter of Mr. Trump, then they quietly choose not to openly celebrate his victory in my presence, for fear that they may raise my ire and cause me to unleash a passionate barrage of anger. If they did not vote for him, then they expected me to join with them in their anger, despair, and uncertainty at the future of our country’s well-being.

After my general disclaimer that “Whoever sits in the White House, it is God that sits on the throne of Heaven,” I had to remind them that, even when the person that they voted for wins the election, there is no guarantee that the world that they wanted to see will come to pass. When Barack Obama ran for President both times, the African American community and communities of other races, faiths and cultures came out overwhelmingly to support him and the dream of hope and change that he represented. However, as time progressed, we African Americans saw President Obama move to support agendas that had nothing to do with the issues that we face as a people. We now realize that it takes more than an African American President to heal our communities, and to help us move out of some of the issues facing us as African Americans.


WHERE DO YOU STAND?

In 2008, then Senator Barack Obama was nominated as the Democratic candidate for the President of the United States at the Democratic

National Convention. Bishop Charles Blake Sr. addressed the convention (see video, right); he also participated in a number of interviews during that time. I distinctly remember Bishop expressing the dichotomy – the double identity – of our political existence as African Americans. I heard him describe how traditionally, because of our values and morals, we are conservative; but with our political perspectives we are more progressive. We were taught by the example of our parents and grandparents the Biblical, traditional structure and values of God and family; and how, with hard work and discipline, an individual could rise to a higher level in life.

On the other hand, in our political perspectives, we are progressive. We have seen how the Federal Government, as far back as Reconstruction, had a large hand in ensuring that we as African Americans attained the rights espoused in our Constitution. We remember when the U.S. Marshals, and at times the National Guard, had to escort young African Americans to high schools and universities in the South, just so they could learn and get an education.

As a strong believer in pro-life values and traditional definitions of marriage, Bishop Blake has applauded the conservative defense of these values. However, he has decried the fact that their love and concern for the unborn stops at birth, and that more effort on their part is put into the construction of prisons than into the institutions which would build productive citizens. We, like Bishop Blake, applaud and agree with the progressive assertion that equal rights and opportunities should be available to every citizen of our nation, and that the Federal Government should protect those rights. But we, as African Americans, cannot agree with either the wholesale annihilation of millions of unborn children through abortion; or the equating of sexual preference with that of racial designation and the human rights that accompany that designation. We also cannot agree with the destruction of the traditional definitions of family and marriage.

ON THE LORD’S SIDE

We, as African American Christians, realize that we must articulate an agenda that speaks to both of our identities within the conservative and progressive agenda. The Progressives say to the African American that if we believe in Civil Rights; in the work of Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. and others who fought in that struggle, then we should vote Democrat.  The Conservatives say that if we as African Americans believe in God and in Christian values, then we should vote Republican: yet, neither party speaks to the totality of issues and concerns of our community.

It is only when we, as a people, begin to articulate an agenda of our own, which speaks to both our moral and our constitutional values, that we can begin to change our communities, and, in turn, our nation. Until that time however, there will be those who seek to define and articulate our agenda for us, and we will continue to be torn between two worlds and at war with one another. If this continues to be the case Beloved, it will not matter who is in the White House.

 

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Elder Charles Edward Blake II serves as Assistant Pastor and Director of Community Relations of West Angeles Church of God In Christ, under the leadership of Presiding Bishop Charles Edward Blake, Sr. He received his BS in Marketing from Oral Roberts University, and studied for his MD at the Interdenominational Theological Center. Elder Blake also serves as the General Manager of the Los Angeles Ecumenical Congress.  He and his wife DeAndra are the proud parents of two sons. 

 


VIDEO INSET: Presiding Bishop Charles E. Blake, Sr. discusses human value and a pro-life perspective at the Interfaith Gathering of the 2008 DNC. Video, courtesy of C-Span.

Hear Donnie McClurkin sing his anthem to the church, “Stand”, below:

The First Lady dances with the Commander-in-Chief.  Photo, Pete Souza.

A Case for Michelle (Not That She Needs It)…

Shara Stewart honors First Lady Michelle Obama and reflects upon the importance of her role in her husband’s historic time in office, on this final day of the Obama Presidency, January 20, 2017.

 

Please click the images below to enlarge the slideshow.

“Charm is deceitful and beauty is passing, but a woman who fears the Lord, she shall be praised. Give her of the fruit of her hands, and let her own works praise her in the gates”

– Proverbs 31:30-31 (NKJV)
 

Michelle Obama is, and will always be, the definitive “Shero” (not a typo… She-Hero) for every little Black girl and every enlightened Black woman. She is the living embodiment of every poem that Maya Angelou has penned, and while everyone sees that Barack continued the dream of Dr. Martin Luther King, let us never miss the fact that Michelle Obama has grabbed the baton from Coretta Scott King with a type of grace and poignancy previously unimaginable.

I remember reading an article which indicated that Michelle was somewhat of a reluctant First Lady. I can relate, as I remember being reluctant to take on a certain title of my own (In my case, I had no problem supporting the man and his dream, even when I found that my place in said dMICHELLE wavesream was unclear. But that’s a story for another day). She managed to take my exact fears and show me how to walk right through them. I learned from her. I followed her. I realized, even with my doubts, that I, Shara, could be someone’s Michelle.

And to think, a woman who once wore the same nappy pigtails I did, whose high cheekbones and thick thighs match my own and those of the women in my family, has spent the last eight years planting vegetables on the White House lawn. She did this not because she was paid to, but because she chose to as a hobby. On a slow Sunday morning. Sipping lemonade. My God, my God.

She is the Wife we hope to be, adored, adorned, supported, and completely satisfied by the life she chose and the man she stands behind. She is the Mother we pray God will allow us to be, raising two daughters who are so clearly poised to be queens.

She allowed (YES: allowed) her husband to stand and lead, while knowing that she was just as smart, capable, and competent as he. She shows us the unmistakable beauty and strength in the submission the Bible charges us aspiring Proverbs 31 women to take on. She wears that submission beautifully, knowing that she has chosen to submit to a man who loves her exactly the way that Christ loves the Church.

 

INTELLIGENCE IN MOTION

Michelle has breathed new life into the elegance of intelligence. In my daydreams, I see Barack giving her the rough draft of his official address, and her final edits turn it into the speech he gives to the American people. I listen to his speeches and hear where he chose to use her words. Every time I hear her speak, I am completely convicted and charged to do more, to be more, to study harder, to read one more book; to become who she would want me to be. Her mind is as beautiful as her smile; her mission as powerful as her gait.

She shows us all, but especially us black women and girls, what it looks like to Win. She is undoubtedly herself, and yet, she is all of us.

I thank her. From the bottom of my very very grateful heart. I am nothing but selfish, wishing her four more years as First Lady; not for her sake, or even for the sake of the country, but for my own. I want to watch her just a bit longer. There is more for her to teach me.

Stay “Mo”… stay.


Unless otherwise credited, all photos, Pete Souza for the White House; many thanks.

The Obama Family celebrates Christmas at the White House, 2016 (L-R): Malia, Sasha, Barack and Michelle. Photo, Theo Wargo.

President Obama Bids Farewell to the American People

“…The greatest among you should be like the youngest, and the one who rules like the one who serves” – Luke 22:26

 “His story is the American story — values from the heartland, a middle-class upbringing in a strong family, hard work and education as the means of getting ahead, and the conviction that a life so blessed should be lived in service to others” – Whitehouse.gov

Click on the images below to enlarge gallery.

Today, Americans say a tearful “Farewell” to the first African American President, Barack H. Obama and the First Family as they leave the Whitehouse. He was elected as the 44th President of the United States on November 4, 2008; he was sworn in to his historic presidency on January 20, 2009. He was re-elected in 2012 and served a second term. President Obama and his family served our country with grace, dignity and honor; embodying the hopes and dreams of a generation. We thank you, Mr. President, First Lady Michelle, Malia and Sasha, for your wonderful eight years of service to the American people: you’ve made us proud.

Below is the President’s final thank-you letter to America, sent to the White House email list on the morning of January 19, 2017:

President Barack Obama sent out his farewell letter to the American people on January 19, 2017.

 

 

“Our Constitution is a remarkable, beautiful gift. But it’s really just a piece of parchment. It has no power on its own. We, the people, give it power…This is where I learned that change only happens when ordinary people get involved and they get engaged, and they come together to demand it.”

“I think we’re going to see people of merit rise up from every race, faith, corner of this country, because that’s America’s strength,” Obama said. “Sometimes I get mad and frustrated like everybody else does, but at my core, I think we’re going to be OK,” he said. “We just have to fight for it; we have to work for it and not take it for granted.”  

 “I’m asking you to believe. Not in my ability to bring about change — but in yours.”

 

– Quotes, farewell address of President Barack H. Obama,  1-10-2017.  Click video below to see entire address.



All images (except featured image by Theo Wargo), Pete Souza .

 

 

 

 

Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King and his wife, Coretta King.  Photo, courtesy The King Center.

The Extraordinary the Life of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.

“…‘Love your neighbor as yourself.’ All the law and the prophets depend on these two commandments” -Matthew 22:39-40 (NET ) 

Reverend Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. was one of the greatest leaders in world history. Dr. King led a nonviolent movement in the late 1950s-60s, which began in the African American communities of the segregated south. Its purpose was  to achieve legal equality and economic justice for all, the effects of which were felt not only in the United States, but also worldwide.

Dr. King’s work has transformed the lives of African Americans, women, the poor, and people of other colors and faiths in America, opening the door to greater, unprecedented opportunities for advancement in all areas of life. The purpose of the Civil Rights Movement was to establish the Constitutional and Biblical principles of equality, liberty and freedom for all in America. Dr. King’s work with the movement ignited and inspired people of other cultures and faiths worldwide in their own struggle for freedom.

THE LIFE OF DR. KING: A TIMELINE

A timeline of key events in the extraordinary life of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. follows:

1929: Born  on Jan. 15, 1929, in Atlanta, GA, Martin Luther King was the son, grandson, and great-grandson of Baptist ministers. Named Michael King at birth, King was renamed “Martin” when he was about 6 years old. His father, Martin Luther King Sr., pastor of Ebenezer Baptist Church, and his mother, Alberta (Williams) King, a former schoolteacher, shared the Auburn Avenue home where Dr. King spent his early years with his maternal grandparents, the Rev. Adam Daniel Williams and Jeannie Celeste Williams.

1944-48: King attends Morehouse College, majoring in sociology. Although initially reluctant to follow his calling, Dr. Benjamin Mays, President of Morehouse College, showed him that a religious career could be intellectually satisfying as well as the right foundation with which to pursue the ideals of social change. Dr. King he was ordained during his final semester at Morehouse.

President Eisenhower meets with civil rights leaders on June 23, 1958. From left to right: the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr., E. Frederic Morrow, Eisenhower, and A. Philip Randolph, William Rogers, and Roy Wilkins. (The Associated Press)

President Eisenhower meets with civil rights leaders on June 23, 1958. (L-R): the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr., E. Frederic Morrow, Eisenhower, A. Philip Randolph, William Rogers, and Roy Wilkins. (AP)during his final semester.

1951: King began doctoral studies in systematic theology at Boston University’s School of Theology. It was during his time in the Boston area where he met met and courted Coretta Scott, an Alabama-born Antioch College graduate who was then a student at the New England Conservatory of Music. They married two years later.

1955: Dr. King received his doctorate from Crozer Theological Seminary in Chester, PA. He became pastor of the Dexter Avenue Baptist Church in Montgomery, AL, making his first mark on the civil-rights movement by mobilizing the black community during a 382-day boycott of the city’s bus lines. The U.S. Supreme Court ultimately declared bus segregation unconstitutional.

1957: Dr. King laid the groundwork for the organization now known as the Southern Christian Leadership Conference (SCLC). He was elected as its president, and he soon began helping other communities organize their own protests against discrimination.

1963: In Birmingham, AL, during a non-violent protest for fair hiring practices and the desegregation of department-store facilities, police brutality used against the marchers dramatized the plight of blacks to the nation at large. Dr. King was arrested during the protest. He wrote“Letter from a Birmingham Jail” during his imprisonment. He then became a principal speaker at the historic March on Washington, where he delivered one of the most passionate addresses of his career to a multi-racial, multi-cultural crowd, the largest which had ever assembled there on behalf of a common cause in US history. Time magazine designated him as its Person of the Year for 1963.

Alabama State Troopers swing clubs to break up a voter-demonstration march in Selma, Alabama. March 8, 1965. AP wirephoto (Associated Press / )

Troopers swing clubs to break up a voter-demonstration march in Selma, Alabama. March 8, 1965.  (AP)

1964: At 35 years old, Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. became the youngest person to win the Nobel Peace Prize  (see Dr. King’s original notes for his renowned Nobel Prize acceptance speech HERE). In Selma, Ala., he led a voter-registration campaign that ended in the Selma-to-Montgomery Freedom March. King next brought his crusade to Chicago, where he launched programs to rehabilitate the slums and provide housing.

Dr. King rallied behind a new cause: the war in Vietnam. Here, King began to also address poverty, which he saw as a fundamental connection to the cause of the war; students, professors, intellectuals, clergymen and reformers rushed into the movement as well. He called for a guaranteed family income, he threatened national boycotts, and he spoke of disrupting entire cities by non-violent “camp-ins.” With this in mind, he began to plan a massive March of the Poor on Washington, D.C., envisioning a demonstration of such intensity and size that Congress would have to recognize and deal with the huge number of desperate and downtrodden Americans.

1968: On April 4, 1968, at the age of 39, Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. was assassinated. He was felled by an assassin’s bullet as he stood with Jesse Jackson and Ralph Abernathy on the balcony of the black-owned Lorraine Hotel in Memphis, TN. The hotel is now the site of the National Civil Rights Museum.

1983: Legislation for a Holiday honoring Dr. King was first introduced four days after Dr. King’s assassination. It was signed into law in 1983. He is the only non-president to have a national holiday dedicated in his honor, and is the only non-president memorialized on the Great Mall in Washington, DC, our nation’s capitol.

 

7 QUOTES FROM THE DR. MARTIN LUTHER KING, JR.

Today, we honor the legacy and memory of the Reverend Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. with 7 of his quotes  on racism, social change, and nonviolence:

  • “Racism is a philosophy based on a contempt for life…It separates not only bodies, but minds and spirits. Inevitably, it descends to inflicting spiritual and physical homicide upon the out-group.”
  • “We are now faced with the fact that tomorrow is today. We are confronted with the fierce urgency of now…”

  • “Ultimately a great nation is a compassionate nation. No individual or nation can be great if it does not have a concern for ‘the least of these.’”

  • “A nation that continues year after year to spend more money on military defense [rather] than on programs of social uplift is approaching spiritual death.”

  • “It is the arrogant assertion that one race is the center of value and object of devotion, before which other races must kneel in submission.” 
  • “I have a dream that my four little children will one day live in a nation where they will not be judged by the color of their skin, but by the content of their character.”

  • “Darkness cannot drive out darkness; only light can do that. Hate cannot drive out hate, only love can do that.”

See video excerpts from the historic March on Washington below, courtesy of The History Channel.


The King Library and Archives in Atlanta is the largest repository of primary source materials on Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. and the American Civil Rights Movement in the world. Significant records which document the social, cultural, economic and political impact of the civil rights movement are housed at the King Library and Archives, and are available online. See more at: http://www.thekingcenter.org/

Images and quotes, courtesy of The King Center.org. and The Seattle Times (accessed January 15, 2016).  http://www.thekingcenter.org/about-dr-king.

A 2017 graphic honoring the national Martin Luther King Holiday reflects its world-wide, cross-cultural reach.

 

A young Elder Blake enjoys his first church office.

West Angeles Celebrates Bishop’s 48 Years of Service

Deacon David Moore and the congregation of West Angeles Church of God In Christ celebrate Presiding Bishop Charles E. Blake’s 48 years of excellence in service on Sunday, January 8, 2017.

(Please click the images below to enlarge gallery).

48 Years…that’s a long time on a job. A long time to serve with excellence.

When you, Lady Mae and Kim arrived in 1969 to a church with a small membership of 50, who knew you would become Pastor of a congregation of 20,000 plus? God knew.

Who knew you would support hundreds of thousands of orphans in Africa? God knew.

Who knew you would become the Presiding Bishop and Chief Apostle of the Church of God In Christ International for three consecutive terms? God knew.

Who knew you would build this amazing cathedral in which we worship in every week? God knew.

Who knew you would be recognized as a world leader in church growth and organization? God knew.

We thank God that your favorite job is pastoring us. We thank God for all the great preaching and teaching, and for:

  • The weddings you’ve performed
  • The babies you’ve dedicated
  • The families you’re comforted in their time of loss
  • The sick you’ve visited
  • The counseling you’ve provided
  • The church’s financial transparency
  • West Angeles’ 100+ auxiliaries and amazing church staff
  • The phone calls, the letters – the prayers…

The Bible tells us in I Timothy 5:17,

“Let the elders who rule well be considered worthy of double honor, especially those who labor in preaching and teaching.”  

Bishop, you deserve multiples of double honor. Bishop Blake, God is not finished with you yet.  With your “Secret Weapon,” our First Lady Mae Lawrence Blake, with your “amazing physique,” and with all of us by your side, there are great works yet to be done at West Angeles Church.

As you often remind us, I’ll take the liberty to remind you, Pastor, that:

“I see you in the future and you look much better than you look right now.”  

God bless you and we love you – Happy Anniversary!

 

Deacon David G. Moore

Chairman, West Angeles Deacon Board and The Brotherhood Organization


WestAngelesMassChoir performs “Great“, at West Angeles COGIC, 2016.

Women lift Holy hands in prayer.

Please Join Us for a Special “When Women Pray” Tonight

“If we’re to overcome evil, it’s because (women and) mothers unanimously stand to oppose the tide of evil that’s sweeping across our world” – Presiding Bishop Charles E. Blake, Sr.

Ladies, we’re praying for our men!

Please join us as we pray for our husbands, our sons, our fathers and our brothers…our pastor, our leaders, our nation.

Please join us as we join the  church-wide

SPECIAL PRAYER EVENT

TONIGHT

at the 

WHEN WOMEN PRAY 

Event:

North Campus Sanctuary 

6:00 – 7:00 P.M.   

Invite your friends! Prayers are being answered, people are being blessed!

Please contact Peaches Allen at 323-733-8300 for further information.

 Hope to see you tonight, and watch what happens When Women Pray!

                                                         


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Education Enrichment: 3 Important Financial Aid Questions to Ask Now

Attention Class of 2017 Parents!         

Most people believe that the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) is the most important part of the financial aid process. This prompts many to mistakenly ask, “How much will I get from FAFSA”? Many people also believe that the Federal Government provides the financial aid award.

Indeed, without the timely submission of a FAFSA, there will be no financial aid. However, there are three other elements of the application process which are of the utmost importance in determining the financial aid your student receives.

Here are 3 important questions to ask during the financial aid application process:

Please click the image to enlarge or download the Student Aid Report infographic.

Please click the image to enlarge or download the Student Aid Report infographic.

  1. What is the most important document in the Financial Aid application process? The document that is the most essential is the Student Aid Report (SAR). The SAR is formed from the FAFSA, by the US Department of Education.

The most important number on the SAR is the Expected Family Contribution (or EFC), which is found at the top of the SAR. This EFC is the number (in dollars) that is the Department of Education’s estimate of what parents are expected to pay for college. In reality, however, it will NOT BE. Most colleges and universities in NO WAY rely on the EFC to determine what parents will pay. They do use the EFC to determine how much need-based Federal and State Aid that will be received.

In that way, the EFC is most important for lower income families (with incomes below approximately $46,000 per year). However, the EFC is irrelevant for most families whose students are NOT Pell Grant eligible.

 

  1. How do colleges and universities determine if they will award additional grants and scholarships if they are not looking at the EFC? The determination is made according to the laws of the state (in the case of state aid) and by the financial aid rules or policies of private colleges and universities. Incidentally, a University’s upper management, not its financial aid director, sets the policies that determine how institutional awards are given out to families. This is the reason why appeals for more financial aid are only actionable by the Financial Aid Office if something is wrong on the original SAR.

For example, in California, major grants such as university grants and Cal Grants are quite need-based, and are not available in a significant way above income levels of $55,000 for Cal State University and $75,000 for University of California. Other out-of-state public colleges and universities do have aid which meets all or most of the family’s unmet need based on the EFC, but most do not.

 

  1. Where else can significant college institutional funding come from? The answer? The student’s unweighted GPA and SAT/ACT scores, which brings us back to an important truth: because the EFC indicates to the college that they cannot award Federal or State Aid to a student –

Students must earn institutional (college or university) grants and scholarships to help their parents pay for college.

The EFC on the SAR should be read and known, but may not be truly relevant. Because of this, in the meetings and sessions of our program at West Angeles Church, we are helping our parents to determine what college will cost, before and after the financial award is generated. This is an important step in choosing and affordable college.

Feel free to join us in these sessions!

Please call the West Angeles Education Enrichment Program at West Angeles Church of God In Christ for more information. 323-733-8300 ext. 2629.


Deacon John Wilson is Director of West Angeles Church of God In Christ’s Education and Enrichment Ministry (EEM). EEM is provided in accordance with the Urban Initiatives of the Church Of God In Christ (COGIC) International, through the leadership of Presiding Bishop, Charles E. Blake, Sr. To find out more about the various programs and services provided, please click HERE. 

Education & Enrichment Testimonials from West Angeles COGIC on Vimeo.

Our thanks to Discover Student Loans for use of the cool infographic. West Angeles Church of God In Christ is not an agent of Discover Student Loans; nor is the use of this infographic an endorsement of Discover Student Loans.

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