Bishop Blake: Amazing Facts About the Greatness of God, Part II

Presiding Bishop Charles E. Blake continues the exploration of God’s creation in Part II of our series, Amazing Facts About the Greatness of God.

God always has been, and He ever shall be. He stood on nothing, because there was nothing for God to stand on. He created a universe with fantastic characteristics, capacities, and cosmic proportions.  He formed all the stars. He formed all the planets. He gave special favor to the planet earth.  The precision of the heavens declare the wisdom of our God; creation is an expression of God Himself.

The universe is a testimony of the wisdom, the greatness, and the power of our God. In order to create a universe like this, God has to be a God of infinite power and wisdom. But after God created the universe, God kept on working. He caused the earth to bring forth 320,000 types of vegetation – trees, plants, flowers – on the earth. Then, 62,000 species of animal life God caused to bring forth from the earth. For His glory, He gave every species amazing capacities by which to function and survive, and every species utilizes what God has given it to its limit:

Amazing Facts about the greatness of God, Part II: The Pinwheel Galaxy, also known as M101. is in the constellation of Ursa Major (also known as the Big Dipper). It is about 70 percent larger than our own Milky Way Galaxy.

Amazing Facts about the greatness of God, Part II: The Pinwheel Galaxy, also known as M101. is in the constellation of Ursa Major (also known as the Big Dipper). It is about 70 percent larger than our own Milky Way Galaxy.

  • The peregrine falcon can dive at a speed of over 240mph.
  • The cheetah* can run at speeds of 70-75mph.
  • The sailfish is capable of swimming at a speed of 68mph.
  • The black bear can smell a food source 18 miles away, and can walk directly to it.
  • An eagle can fly carrying a weight 4 times as much as its own body weight.

Each species maximizes the abilities deposited within it. Their design and capacities are an indication of the greatness and the wisdom of our God in creating all species of life.

Then God Made Man

In Genesis 1:18, God looked at the animals He had made, and “saw that it was good.” But again, God kept on working. And when God made man, He went to an all-together different level. Genesis 1:25 tells us that God created man in His own image, over every living thing on earth.  As was the earth and the animals, man was created to live on the outer limits of his capacity and his ability.

God is expecting you to operate on the outer limits of your capacity also. You’ve got the power. You’ve got the anointing! The same power that raised up Jesus is available to you. I hope someone will decide today to do the greatest thing: to help the most people, to reach the greatest potential that God can bless you to obtain.

God wants you to be great, and to do great things! Hallelujah!

 

FOR FURTHER READING: Genesis 1:27-31, Psalm 81, Proverbs 3:19, Exodus 19:5, Psalm 24:1, Ephesians 1:18-20.

Adapted from the sermon, “God’s Work and Our Work,” by Presiding Bishop Charles E. Blake at West Angeles Church of God In Christ. See the entire sermon HERE, on West Angeles’ Legacy Broadcast.


*WATCH NOW: “This Is Why You Can’t Outrun A Cheetah” below; excerpt from “Speed Kills,” on the Smithsonian Channel:

Read PART I of Bishop Blake’s series “Amazing Facts About the Greatness of God” HERE


DID YOU KNOW?

  • A life form, or lifeform, is an entity or being that is living. [Scientific] estimates on the number of Earth’s current species range from 10 million to 14 million, of which about 1.2 million have been documented and over 86 percent have not yet been described.
  • In May 2016, scientists reported that 1 trillion species are estimated to be on Earth currently with only one-thousandth of one percent described.
  • More than 99% of all species, amounting to over five billion species, that ever lived on Earth are estimated to be extinct.
  • The Aloe polyphylla of South Africa (pictured above) is commonly known as the spiral aloe in English, lekhala kharatsa in Sesotho, or kroonaalwyn in Afrikaans. The species is highly sought after as an ornamental plant, but is difficult to cultivate and usually soon dies if removed from its natural habitat. In South Africa, buying or collecting the plant is a criminal offence.