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Revival: Break the Bondage of Substance Abuse

Are you struggling with substance abuse, or do you know someone who is? Is your family dealing with a loved one who is suffering from alcoholism, drugs, or other dependencies? If you or someone you love is bending under the pressures of substance abuse and addiction, then please join us for a powerful REVIVAL at West Angeles Church of God In Christ.

SUBSTANCE ABUSE REVIVAL

With Pastor Wess Morgan and the Free-N-One Ministry

July 27th & 28th, 2017

7:00 PM

West Angeles’ North Campus Sanctuary

3045 Crenshaw Boulevard

Los Angeles, CA  90016

Pastor and inspirational recording artist Wess Morgan has walked a rough path—one that might have made another falter. But by the grace of God, Pastor Morgan has proven that he is strong, resilient, and one of the most talented and anointed gospel inspirational artists of this generation. Born in Mississippi to parents  – both pastors – who sang in the church, young Wess knew that God and music were destined to be an integral part of his life as well. But at the age of 11, he began experimenting with drugs and alcohol; eventually becoming addicted to cocaine.  In and out of juvenile detention centers for most of his teens, he spoke to God while in jail in his 20s: and God answered back. “I just cried out to God and asked Him to forgive me…and to help me get straight,” Wess remembers. “I asked Him for a strategy and He spoke one word to me, and that word was ‘accountability.’ I’ve been clean ever since.”

DON’T MISS THIS POWERFUL EVENT!

For more information, please call 323/855-4695.

       

GET INVOLVED: The COGIC Urban Initiatives

Dear West Angeles Family,

We are blessed with infinitely greater opportunities than Black people anywhere on the face of the earth. But we are blessed that we might reach out to those less fortunate, and to lift them and help them. We cannot be satisfied to be in a community that’s blessed and prosperous until we reach out and Bless everyone in that community.

I pray that, in this season, every one of us will stand upon our watch, and that we’ll go to God and pray:

‘God, I just don’t want to stand by. I want to have a positive impact on life on earth; I want to have appositive impact on my children, on my family, on my community. God, show me what you would have me to do show me what direction you would have me to go.’

As Presiding Bishop of the Church of God in Christ, I’ve asked every one of our 12,000 churches across the world to incorporate into their operations 5 areas of emphasis. We call this the Church Of God In Christ Urban Initiatives.

Get Involved: The COGIC Urban Initiatives include progressive programs for youth and young adults.

The 5 areas are:
1. Education – Includes mentoring, tutoring, and Christian education.
2. Economic Development – We offer job training, employment counseling and assistance, and entrepreneurship programs.
3. Crime Prevention – We’ve developed alternative programs to proactively keep young people out of crime,

and to create collaborative relationships with law enforcement.
4. Family – We’ve created programs to strengthen the family with a special emphasis on the role of fathers.
5. Financial Literacy – Includes programs for both young people and adults.

Some of the best leaders in our denomination have been assigned to lead the success of these programs across the nation. If every church has these five areas at work, there will be 60,000 programs in inner city America impacting our nation, impacting our communities, impacting the cities of our nation. West Angeles Church Of God In Christ has all 5 of these areas well covered, and we must expand even more.

We are Blessed to be a Blessing.  We need your gifts, your skills, and your involvement, and we look forward to working with you.

Sincerely,

Bishop Charles E. Blake, Sr.
Presiding Bishop
Church of God in Christ, Inc.

 

GET INVOLVED WITH WEST ANGELES

  • For financial literacy, economic development, and community assistance programs, PLEASE CONTACT: The West Angeles Community Development Corporation at (323) 751-3440. Please click HERE for more information. http://www.westangelescdc.org/
  • For more on our family and personal development programs, PLEASE CONTACT: The West Angeles Counseling Center at (323) 737-7463 or (323) 733-8300×2360, [email protected] http://westa.org/counseling-2/
  • For our “Manhood 2 Fatherhood” sessions, please contact The West Angeles Counseling Center at (323) 737-7463. Please click HERE for more information. http://westa.org/portfolio/manhood-to-fatherhood/
  • For The Brotherhood Organization, please contact (323) 733-8300 http://westa.org/the-brotherhood/
  • For more information on our adult and youth Christian Education Classes including The School of Practical Christian Living, Sunday School, and the West Angeles Bible College, please call (323) 733-8300.
  • For college prep and Education Enrichment contact Deacon John Wilson at (323) 733-8300 x2628, 2629 [email protected] [email protected] http://westa.org/education-enrichment/
  • For Mentoring information, please contact Minister Sam Ransom, email [email protected] or call 323-733-8300 x2629.
  • For West Angeles COGIC Ministries and Auxiliaries – For more information on all of West Angeles’ ministries and auxiliaries, including our Skid Row Ministry, the Prison Ministry and many others, please call 323 733-8300, or CLICK HERE for a complete list. http://westa.org/ministries-departments/

THE COGIC URBAN INITIATIVES: “Building healthy individuals, families, and communities for a successful future.”

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COGIC URBAN INITIATIVES IN ACTION – Please CLICK HERE to watch an inspiring conversation between our Presiding Bishop Charles E. Blake, Sr. and Operation Hope CEO and Founder John Hope Bryant, where they discuss a new COGIC partnership, the legacy of the Civil Rights Movement, and the power of financial literacy for the underserved.

What’s An Idol?

Most of us probably don’t make a connection between our favorite activities and the Bible’s definition of an idol.

We’re probably even content to pawn off our neighbor’s statue of the Virgin Mary as God’s idea of what a “graven image.” But the term idol is mentioned or alluded to so many times in the Bible – even in the 10 Commandments – that worshiping them must be a pretty serious offense!

So, before we discuss what an idol is, let’s first talk about what it isn’t, starting with those carved sculptures that are mentioned so much in the Old Testament. Sure, for those cultures that use them, they can be idols too, but they’re only a representation of the modern issues we’re dealing with today.

Second, let’s look at a passage that best defines what an idol is. Colossians 3:5 says it’s “everything that belongs to your earthly nature: sexual immorality, impurity, lust, evil desires and greed” (NIV). Simply put, an idol is anything we live or swear by which keeps us from truly serving and worshiping God. So, chances are, there are elements of our daily routines which have “idol” written all over them (sorry, but that nightly smoke you “need” to get to sleep? That qualifies too).

Here are five things you probably didn’t know are idols:

  1. Your horoscope. It’s got the First Commandment written all over it (Exodus 20:4). We’re not supposed to worship the image of anything that’s “in heaven above, or that is in the earth beneath, or that is in the water under the earth,” and astrology certainly fits that description. One reason it’s bad: it limits your potential. If you think you’ve got no more capabilities than a goat or a scorpion, then how are you ever going to walk on water?
  2. Television and media images. Yes, I know you’re really into that show, and you also think you can’t live without your Xbox. But entertainment and social media has taken on a life of their own, and these days, unfortunately, there’s very little reality or God in them. Idols created by the entertainment industry now influence almost everything in society, from lifestyle choices to career pursuits. Its images can be as extreme as porn, or as violent as your favorite video game. But they can also be simple images repeated over time, like the thin blonde girl symbolizing universal beauty, or the African American man in handcuffs symbolizing universal fear. These images become idols which influence thought. They illicit desire, disparage a race or gender, create a false reality, or negatively influence our ideas about absolutely everything and everyone – even Jesus. Psalm 97:7 (ESV) lets us know that “All worshipers of images are put to shame, who make their boast in worthless idols.”
  3. Bad habits. Drugs, alcohol and other addictions; phobias, sickness, family history, overeating, uncontrolled emotions, thoughts…the list goes on. How many times have we heard (or said) statements like:

“I just can’t handle [insert phobia here]: that’s just how I am”, or

“We Smiths are [insert vice here]”, or

“My Mom and Grandma had [insert illness here], so I will too…”

Whatever limiting thoughts and ideas we allow ourselves to attach to are not only idols, but they can also influence the way our children and grandchildren think about themselves too (Exodus  20:5).

  1. Society’s norms. Gluttony, racism, oppression, and yes, casual sex; the practices we engage in and ideas we adopt which go against God’s instructions for our lives not only limit our own potential, but also the growth and potential of others.
  2. Money. This is a big one. Yes, it’s part of survival in our society. But love of money is another thing entirely. Jesus makes it plain in Matthew 6:24 that it’s impossible to live for greed and God at the same time. Greed has been at the heart of man’s endeavors from the beginning of time, and manifests itself in a variety of ways, from slavery to economic recession. If the motivation behind any action is monetary gain, as opposed to the intrinsic good of all mankind, then that action becomes an idol. From manufacturing a seed, to building a business, to developing a community or governing a nation: if God didn’t ordain it, then man’s probably in it for profit and control, and its effects diminish and destroy God’s people and His Will for the earth.

Idolatry keeps us from finding true liberty and freedom in Christ, and prevents us and future generations from being all we’re created to be (Exodus 20:2-5). “There are ways which seem right to a man, but in the end are the ways of death” (Proverbs 14:12 and 16:25). That passage defines idolatry in a nutshell, and God seemed to believe the message was so important for us to understand, He sent it twice! But in Proverbs 19:21, He also makes it clear that, in spite of man’s ways, it’s only God’s methods that triumph.

So save yourself years of trials and anguish: drop the idols and do things His way.

SCRIPTURAL REFERENCES: Colossians 3:5, Leviticus 26:1, Psalm 97:7, Exodus 20:2-5, Matthew 6:24, Proverbs 14:12, 16:25, and 19:21.

Bishop Blake: Do You Want To Be Well? Do These 3 Things

Now a certain man was there who had an infirmity thirty-eight years.  When Jesus saw him lying there, and knew that he already had been in that condition a long time, He said to him, “Do you want to be made well?”  John 5:5-6 (NKJV)

In John 5, a man had been infirmed for 38 years; yet Jesus, before He would do anything for the man, asked him, “Do you want to be well?” That may seem like a strange question, but let me inform you that there are many people who say, “I want to be sick.”

Some choose to be sick because:

  • They don’t want to be held accountable. They don’t want to go through what they must endure both spiritually and biblically; they don’t want to rise up to the standard that the Word of God proclaims.
  • They do not want to endure the painful medical treatment, exercise, discipline or diet required to be made well.
  • They choose addictions, perversions, even mental illness; creating a false world into which they can escape, which frees them from the pressures and failures of life.

Jesus was right in asking this man if he wanted to be made well, because so many people settle for just any old thing. But I want to proclaim to you today that the saints should not be at the bottom, the saints ought to be the top! You’re not supposed to be “alright under the circumstances,” because God does not put us “under the circumstances.” You are above these circumstances!

Do You Want To Be Well? Do These 3 Things: Bishop Blake leads a powerful altar call at West Angeles COGIC.

In our lives, we should strive for the best: the best spiritually, the best physically, the best intellectually, the best materially, the best in our marriages, in our appearance, and in every area of our lives. We’re not here in the church just having fun, we’re here to establish lifestyles and habits that will give glory to God, and that will open us up to the blessing of the Lord in our lives.

If you’ve got God in your life, if you’ve got the Holy Ghost, you’ve got One in your life that gives you power to overcome and to surmount any obstacle, any difficulty, and any hardship that you might encounter.

 

DO YOU WANT TO BE HEALED?

You don’t have to be below par. You can be everything that God wants you to be. Healing is yours if you want to be healed, but first, you must:

  1. Repent. Ask God’s forgiveness. So many folks never repent; they go in and out of life without repentance. But every once in a while, you ought to look up to God and say, “Lord at my best, I’m inadequate; at my best, I can’t come up to your standard. Lord, forgive me, and help me to turn around; help me to be the person that you’d have me to be. Lord, I’m sorry. I love you and praise your name. And if I’ve done anything that displeased you, then forgive me and try me one more time.  Lord, I’m here, seeking you with all of my heart.” Healing starts with repentance.
  2. Believe in Jesus. Believe He’s the Son of God; believe into His will and into His way. Put your hand in His hand, and your whole heart in Him. Believe that God so loved the world that He gave His only begotten Son, that whoever believes in Him should not perish but have everlasting life. If you really love Him, then you’re on the way toward healing. Raise your hands and say, “Lord, fill me with the Holy Ghost! I want Your power; I want Your anointing. I want to walk righteously with You.” Step into Jesus; into His love, His power and His righteousness.
  3. Deny thyself. “Then Jesus said to his disciples, “Whoever wants to be my disciple must deny themselves and take up their cross and follow Me” (Matthew 16:24). If you want to do God’s will, then you’ve got to set flesh and self aside, and when you do, God steps in and begins to heal you and take you higher than you’ve ever gone before. Live your life being filled with the Holy Ghost! Holy Ghost power can work healing in your life (Acts 1:8)!

The Bible tells us to examine ourselves; to take heed of ourselves. A person who is not completely healed cannot function at full capacity. What is your spiritual condition? Are you really healthy, or are you only slightly healed? Do you want the best from God? And do you want to do the best for God?

The power of God can work healing to your life. Lift your hands and say,

“Lord, I’m coming to you for a spiritual examination. If you find anything that does not belong in me, work on me and heal me so I can be the person You created me to be! Create in me a clean heart. Lord, I want to live like You want me to live, and to be what you want me to be. Fill me with Your power; fill me with Your anointing. I want to do Your will; I want to walk in Your way to win others for the kingdom.”

God will take you higher than you’ve ever gone before. God can heal you; God can fix you. If God wants to bless anyone, He wants to bless His people: and if you’re one of the people of the Lord, God wants to bless you!

SCRIPTURAL REFERENCES: Jeremiah 6:14, Hosea 14:4, John 3:16, 5:6; Matthew 16:24, Acts 1:8, 1 Timothy 4:16, Isaiah 40:31, Psalm 51:10.

Adapted from the sermon, “Do You want to be Well? by Presiding Bishop Charles E. Blake, Sr.  May 28, 2017, at West Angeles Church of God in Christ. Watch the entire sermon on The Legacy Broadcast HERE.

Hear Pastor Donnie McClurkin sing, “Create In Me A Clean Heart” below:

The information on this site is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. All content, including text, graphics, images and information, contained on or available through this web site is for general information purposes only. West Angeles Church Of God In Christ makes no representation and assumes no responsibility for the accuracy of information contained on or available through this web site, and such information is subject to change without notice. You are encouraged to confirm any information obtained from or through this web site with your doctor and other sources, and to review all information regarding any medical condition or treatment with your physician. Consult your doctor before starting any new eating or exercise regimen.

Black Women and Health: 8 Actions to Take Now

But you are a chosen generation, a royal priesthood, a holy nation, His own special people, that you may proclaim the praises of Him who called you out of darkness into His marvelous light – 1 Peter 2: (NKJV)

Most medical research conducted in the United States does not include a detailed study of African American women or the uniqueness of the African American physiology.  That lack of knowledge has created disparities in the quality of medical care which African Americans receive. In 1984, the Black Women’s Health Imperative, previously the National Black Women’s Health Project, was formed in Atlanta, GA to address those disparities, and to address the health and reproductive rights of African American women. NBWHP was founded by MacArthur Fellow Byllye Avery, who was particularly influenced by the impact that public policy had on women of color and poor women.

The Black Women’s Health Imperative (BWHI), based in Washington, DC, is the only national organization dedicated to improving the health and wellness of our nation’s 21 million Black women and girls – physically, emotionally and financially. Their mission is to lead the effort to solve the most pressing health issues that affect Black women and girls in the U.S.

Also, in 1995, Boston University’s Black Women’s Health Study (BWHS) was launched, sending health questionnaires to thousands of women including Essence magazine subscribers and the members of  Black Nurses’ Association. For the past 22 years, the study has continued to gather data annually on the 59,000 women who returned completed questionnaires in 1995. The Black Women’s Health Imperative has used research of the BWHS to develop programs, initiatives and awareness to keep African American women healthy.

FINDINGS OF THE STUDY

Black Women and Health: 8 Actions to Take Now. Infographic, courtesy BWHI.org.

Black women are more likely to develop certain health problems than white women. Until the 1990s, most of the studies of women’s health included only small numbers of Black women or none at all. Improving the health of Black women required more knowledge of the causes of these health problems and also more knowledge about how women stay healthy. More knowledge meant more research.

Through collaborations between the two groups, findings from the application of their research have included:

  • Racism affects physical health. Experiences of racism are stressors that might result in health issues. Among participants under age 50, women who reported frequent experiences of racism in daily life or in housing, on the job, and by police were more likely to develop breast cancer. No other study has reported on this issue. Racism is also a contributor to increased obesity through changes in eating or exercise habits. In the BWHS, the occurrence of obesity was greater among women who had the greatest experiences of racism. This was the case whether women lived in segregated or non-segregated neighborhoods.
  • Stress is the enemy. Too much stress can contribute to the onset of diseases: not just psychological illnesses, but physical maladies as well, such as heart disease, obesity, and premature births.  Stress can also create chronic inflammation in the body, which can create other serious physical problems.
  • Breast cancer shows up earlier: and deadlier. Black women are diagnosed with breast cancer at a younger age (median age is 58 for black women, 62 for white women) and die at a younger age than white women (median age is 62 for black women, 69 for white women).
  • Lupus occurs much more commonly among Black women than among other ethnic groups, and yet it is still a rare illness even among Black women.
  • Sitting for long periods increases cancer risk. Women who sit for more than 10 hours a day – even at work – have a 40 percent higher incidence of breast cancer, as compared to those who sat for fewer than five hours a day.
  • Beware of the night shift – The incidence of type 2 diabetes in the BWHS was greater among women who had worked a night shift for at least 10 years than among women who had not worked night shifts. A possible mechanism may involve sleep disturbances, which are increasingly being associated with adverse health effects.
  • More fried foods and meat mean more cancer. High intake of foods in the meat-fried food pattern was associated with a higher risk of cancer.

WHAT YOU CAN DO NOW

Does God want us to be healthy? Yes! God has created us to follow His Word; God’s Word and God’s ways bring us health and strength (Proverbs 3). Here are 8 actions to take now, compiled from the findings of the Black Women’s Health Imperative and the Black Women’s Health Study, with support from the American Heart Association, which can help us to achieve the optimum health which God intends for us:

Black Women and Health: 8 Actions to Take Now – You don’t need an acre to grow edibles; greens, lettuces and certain fruits and vegetables can even be grown in pots.

1. Be proactive about your health (Matthew 7:7-8, 1 Corinthians 6:19).  Get regular physicals, pap smears, and mammograms from doctors you can trust. Ask for referrals, ask questions, and get additional doctors’ opinions on diagnoses. Many doctors will treat us based on our weaknesses: not our strengths, or our ability to change our lifestyles and our eating habits! They will often not offer eating or exercise plans as solutions to common health problems. Seek out information about Black women’s health issues, and healthy eating and lifestyles. Be innovative! Our ancestors and forefathers have always created, invented, and “made a way out of no way.” Grow edibles!  Even if you don’t have the yard space, lettuces and certain vegetables can even be grown in pots or planters.  Create and discover new ways of cooking healthy at home (as opposed to eating out), which studies have found is associated with better health.

2. Get involved with your church. (Hebrews 10:25, Colossians 3:16). Studies show that religious involvement is associated with a healthy mental outlook. The Word of God provides peace, wisdom, and “strength to your bones” (Proverbs 3:8); church provides a support system of friends and neighbors, inspiration, and the opportunity to help others, among other benefits. Women in the studies who said they were very involved in their church tended to report excellent or very good mental health. Not surprising, right?

3. Change your environment – even if it means just taking a day trip (Genesis 12:1, Acts 7:3).  Most people tend to be happier when they’re traveling for leisure or vacationing, of course, but a takeaway learned from a recent Cornell University study is that people also experience a direct increase in happiness from just planning a trip. And according to a joint study from the Global Commission on Aging, and the Transamerica Center for Retirement Studies, traveling actually keeps us healthier. The study found that women who vacation at least twice a year show a significantly lower risk of suffering a heart attack than those who only travel every six years or so. Also, according to the BWHS, women who lived in poorer neighborhoods more often developed diabetes than women who lived in wealthier areas. So getting away from the ol’ neighborhood for a change of scenery holds benefits for the body, mind and spirit.

4. Fill your plate with mostly fruits and vegetables (Genesis 1:29). It’s not only healthy…it’s Biblical! Include whole grains, root vegetables, dark berries and dark leafy greens in your diet. High intake of foods in the fruit-vegetable pattern was associated with lower cancer risk. Avoid or cut down on processed foods; any food that has 20 ingredients or more should be viewed with suspicion. Cut down on serving sizes. Also important: drink lots of water.

5. Cut out excess sugar and salt (Matthew 5:13-16). Limit high-calorie foods like sweets. Avoid drinks with added sugar. Cancers feed off of sugars, and excess salt creates inflammation: which accompanies many medical conditions including heart disease and diabetes.

6. Stand! (Ephesians 6:13). Stand while working, preparing foods: whenever you can. Walk around for short periods at work, even if watching television. Studies have shown that a sedentary lifestyle which results in 10 or more hours of sitting per day also results in 40 percent greater breast cancer risk. A 50% greater risk for diabetes was shown in those who sat for five hours a day or more.

7. Exercise! (Isaiah 40:31) Vigorous exercise reduces hypertension and depression. Participation in vigorous physical activity was associated with a decreased occurrence of both depression and hypertension among BWHS participants.

8. Rest. (Genesis 20:10) Get adequate sleep.  Sleep deprivation has been shown to not only affect the sex life, memory and physical appearance, but it can also put us at risk for serious health problems such as heart disease, high blood pressure, stroke and diabetes. Have stress-free mechanisms for relaxation. Prayer; hobbies such as art, gardening and being outdoors in nature; deep breathing exercises, stretching, listening to soothing, uplifting music: all are examples of relaxing activities we can engage in to keep stress at bay.

Finally:
“I beseech you therefore, brethren, by the mercies of God, that you present your bodies a living sacrifice, holy, acceptable to God, which is your reasonable service. 2 And do not be conformed to this world, but be transformed by the renewing of your mind, that you may prove what is that good and acceptable and perfect will of God.” Romans 12:1-2.

With the mighty resurrection power of Jesus as our guide, we can do all things through Him who strengthens us.

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Hear the voices of the Black Women’s Health Study Advisory Board speak about the impact and importance of the Black Women’s Health Study below:

Read Bishop Blake’s post, “DO YOU WANT TO BE WELL? DO THESE 3 THINGS”.  Please CLICK HERE to read.

The information on this site is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. All content, including text, graphics, images and information, contained on or available through this web site is for general information purposes only. West Angeles Church Of God In Christ makes no representation and assumes no responsibility for the accuracy of information contained on or available through this web site, and such information is subject to change without notice. You are encouraged to confirm any information obtained from or through this web site with your doctor and other sources, and to review all information regarding any medical condition or treatment with your physician. Consult your doctor before starting any new eating or exercise regimen.

Bishop Blake: Your Power, Your Authority

Presiding Bishop Charles E. Blake, Sr. reminds us to use the badge of power, authority, and strength found only through Jesus Christ.

 “Whatever you ask in My name, that will I do…If you ask anything in my name, I will do it” –  John 14:13-14

There are some who try to impersonate officers of the law. They will paint their cars as close to that of a police officer as they can, putting on some kind of phony uniform, trying to act like they are an officer of the law. But listen…trying to act like an officer does not make you a policeman  A true deputy is a person appointed as substitute. He is someone who has the power to act.

It is an impressive thing when you read the scriptures that imply that we are deputies of God and of his son Jesus Christ. All these privileges, powers and rights are conferred upon believer,  and you cannot confer authority upon others unless you have established authority within yourself.

“Behold, I give unto you power to tread on serpents and scorpions, and over all the power of the enemy, and nothing shall by any means hurt you.” – Luke 10:19 (KJV)

Who gives us our power? What gives us our authority? Our authority comes from:

  1. God. Jesus Christ gives us our badges. Our badges imply that we are empowered and authorized to act on His behalf. Don’t try to walk the earth on your own authority. People and devils will not respond to us. But when we go forth in the name and the power of Jesus Christ, we can change our situation.
  2. The Word. The power of your authority is in the Word of God; the Word is power! If you stand on the word, the devil has got to back up and step aside in the name of Jesus!
  3.  Prayer. Prayer is the key to the kingdom, and faith unlocks the door. Sometimes our answer is detained; sometimes the miracle we want does not happen right away. He may not come when you want Him, but He’ll be right on time. Hold on to your faith. Hold on to your badge.

    Your Power, Your Authority: Bishop Blake praises the Lord.

Is there anybody who needs to change their situation? Is there anybody who knows that God can change things? If you’re a saved person, you’ve got authority. You are an agent of the Kingdom. You are somebody. Don’t live beneath your privilege. Don’t let problems discourage you. Use your badge!

Holy Ghost power is what we need in this day and time; the Holy Ghost is our back-up! Raise your hands and say,

“Father, I stretch my hand to thee; no other help I know. Lord, I need your power! I need your might! I need your anointing!” 

You can do all things through Christ who strengthens you. If you use your badge, God will show up in your life. You are an agent of the Kingdom!

Hallelujah!

Adapted from the sermon titled, “Use Your Badge,” at West Angeles Church of God In Christ.This entire sermon and more is available HERE, at West Angeles Gospel On Demand

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SCRIPTURAL REFERENCES – John 14:12-14, 16:15; Luke 9:1, Mark 16:15-17, Matthew 10:1-7; Luke 10:19, Matthew 16:19, 18:20, 10:40; Ephesians 6:16, Exodus 12:23, 1 Corinthians 1:18, Revelations 1:5, Matthew 6:31, Acts 19:13, Luke 9:23, John 13:34, Judges 16, Daniel 10, Hebrews 14:12, Matthew 22:29, Ephesians 3:20, Acts 1:8, Romans 8:31, Acts 4:13-31, Jeremiah 33:3, Daniel 3:19-26, Isaiah 41:10, Psalm 34:7, Isaiah 40:31.

 

Hear the West Angeles Youth and Young Adult Choir sing,” We need your power”, featuring Darius Maxey. At WEST ANGELES CHURCH OF GOD IN CHRIST.

Bishop Blake: Motivation in Tough Times

Then He said to them, “My soul is exceedingly sorrowful, even to death. Stay here and watch with Me. 39He went a little farther and fell on His face, and prayed, saying, “O My Father, if it is possible, let this cup pass from Me; nevertheless, not as I will, but as You will” – Matthew 26:38

At the time of His arrest in the Garden of Gethsemane, Jesus’ agony and sorrow became more and more intense in His heart. He had just finished the Passover Supper with the disciples, and He was aware that this was the last meal that they would share together before His crucifixion. In the scripture above, in essence, Jesus prayed, “Father if you can find any other way to redeem men, then do not make me go through this. I don’t want to do this: but if you want me to…I’ll die on a cross for the world.

“It’s not what I want: it’s what You want.”

There are many times in the life of the believer where what he has to do as a believer is not what he wants to do as a person. However, when you have to do what you don’t want to do:

  1. Be honest with God. When we’re honest with God, God has a way of showing up and giving us the help that we need.
  2. Enhance your spiritual desires. The best way to overcome one desire is with a stronger desire.
  3. Pray. Prayer is spiritual therapy. Pray until you feel the power and the presence of Almighty God; pray until the Holy Ghost shows up and takes over the prayer. When God shows up, He gives you power and strength, and every problem is resolved. “Praying through” will help you to go through!
  4. Find the joy in what you have to do. God’s presence can bring you joy. When you know you’re pleasing God; when you know that God will bring you through: even though it might be painful or unpleasant, joy begins to come into your heart, and you’re able to say, “Hallelujah, anyhow!”
  5. You’ll be better than when you started. Job looked at his situation and said, “God knows the way that I take, and when He’s tried me, I shall come forth shining like gold.” Your blessing is in doing what you don’t want to do. God will bless you if you obey Him.

JESUS: OUR EXAMPLE, OUR MESSIAH

If you’re going through something tough, God may be getting you ready for something that’s more than you ever imagined you would do. Every trial takes us higher; every challenge takes us higher.

Jesus had to do what He did not want to do. He did not want to have nails driven into His hands and feet. He did not want to be pierced in His side. But because of God’s love for the world, Jesus died so that we might have life. This is the mortar that holds all the other factors together and thank God Jesus loved us!

After Jesus was buried, God raised Him up again, and exalted Him above all men. If God could raise Jesus up, there’s nothing He cannot do.

When you have to do what you don’t want to do, remember Jesus.

Adapted from the sermon, “When You Have To Do What You Don’t Want To Do,” by Presiding Bishop Charles Edward Blake, at West Angeles Church of God In Christ, 4/9/2017. To hear this entire sermon and more, please CLICK HERE for the West Angeles Legacy Broadcast.

SCRIPTURAL REFERENCES – Hebrews 9:22, Ezekiel 18:4, Romans 6:23, 33, 8:28; Matthew 16:24, Jude 20, Proverbs 21:15, 16:9, Psalm 16:11, Job 23:1, Philippians 2:5.

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NEED MORE INSPIRATION? Come home to West Angeles! Join us each Sunday at 8 a.m. and 11 a.m. at the Cathedral, 3600 Crenshaw Boulevard, Los Angeles, CA 90016.

(Featured photo, courtesy, Wiki Commons).

Inspiring Quotes from Great Women in History Part II

 

West Angeles Church of God in Christ concludes Women’s History Month with more wonderful,  inspirational quotes by women of achievement. 

“To me success means effectiveness in the world, that I am able to carry my ideas and values into the world–that I am able to change it in positive ways.”

— Maxine Hong Kingston, author of “Woman Warrior”

 

“I’ve learned that people will forget what you said, people will forget what you did, but people will never forget how you made them feel.”

10 Inspiring Quotes by Great Women in History, Part II: Judge Constance Baker Motley.

10 Inspiring Quotes by Great Women in History, Part II: Judge Constance Baker Motley.

— Maya Angelou, African-American poet

 

“I rejected the notion that my race or sex would bar my success in life.”

— Constance Baker Motley, first African-American woman to serve as a federal judge

 

“For what is done or learned by one class of women becomes, by virtue of their common womanhood, the property of all women.”

–  Elizabeth Blackwell, first female physician in the United States

 

“You may be disappointed if you fail, but you are doomed if you don’t try.”

— Beverly Sills, former American opera soprano

 

“I’m not afraid of storms, for I’m learning to sail my ship.”

— Louisa May Alcott, author of “Little Women”

“If the first woman God ever made was strong enough to turn the world upside down all alone, these together ought to be able to turn it back and get it right side up again.”

— Sojourner Truth, African-American abolitionist

 

“It is better to look ahead and prepare than to look back and regret.”

— Jackie Joyner-Kersee, first woman to win back-to-back gold medals in the Summer Olympics

 

“If you hear the dogs, keep going. If you see the torches in the woods, keep going. If there’s shouting after you, keep going. Don’t ever stop. Keep going. If you want a taste of freedom, keep going.”

― Harriet Tubman, African-American abolitionist, humanitarian, and former slave

 

“Make a difference about something other than yourselves.”

— Toni Morrison, author of “Song of Solomon” and first African-American to win the Nobel Prize for Literature

 

“I think the girl who is able to earn her own living and pay her own way should be as happy as anybody on earth. The sense of independence and security is very sweet.”

— Susan B. Anthony, American suffragette and advocate of women’s rights

Be uplifted by West Angeles’ Praise & Worship team lead by David Daughtery, and Soloist Carolyn Johnson-White below:

Inspiring Quotes from Great Women in History Part II: West Angeles Mass Choir Sermonic Selection, “I Never Lost My Praise” by Kurt Carr, on Vimeo.


  • “A DAY IN MAY WITH MAE” is back!   First Lady Mae L. Blake and the Women’s Affairs Committee invite you to join us for lunch on Women’s Day 2017.  Details to come on Westa.org.  The color for this year: “Pretty In Pink”!
  • For more inspirational quotes by women of wisdom, resilience, and courage, please click HERE.
  • Did you miss West Angeles’ spectacular Black History Month Presentation? Please CLICK HERE for highlights.

 

10 Inspiring Quotes by Great Women in History, Part I

Likewise, older women are to show their reverence for God by their behavior. They are not to be gossips or addicted to alcohol, but to be examples of goodness. They should encourage the younger women to love their husbands, to love their children, to be sensible and pure, to manage their households, to be kind, and to submit themselves to their husbands. Otherwise, the word of God may be discredited. Titus 2:3-5 (ISV)

 

March is Women’s History Month!  On Westa.org, we celebrate the strength and resilience of women throughout history.  Below is a list of 10 inspiring quotes by great women in history who have surpassed obstacles to emerge untarnished on the other side; women who have paved the way for the next generation to reach for their dreams and to make them come true.

May you be inspired and encouraged to live your life to the fullest by the ancestors that have proved your capability and influence as a child of God.

 

“I have learned over the years that when one’s mind is made up, this diminishes fear; knowing what must be done does away with fear.”

— Rosa Parks, African-American civil rights activist

 

“Life is not easy for any of us. But what of that? We must have perseverance and above all confidence in ourselves. We must believe that we are gifted for something and that this thing must be attained.”

– Marie Curie, chemist and physicist

 

“Great leaders never accept the world as it was and always work for the world as it should be.”

– Condoleezza Rice,  Former United States Secretary of State
WOMENMarieDaly

10 Inspiring Quotes by Great Women in History: Marie M. Daly, The first female African-American to earn a PhD in Chemistry, Columbia University, 1947.

 

 

 

“Courage… it’s a habitus, a habit, a virtue: you get it by courageous acts. It’s like you learn to swim by swimming. You learn courage by couraging” – Marie M. Daly, The first female African-American to earn a PhD in Chemistry

 

 

“You should never view your challenges as a disadvantage. Instead, it’s important for you to understand that your experience facing and overcoming adversity is actually one of your biggest advantages. ”
– Michelle Obama, first African American First Lady of the United States

 

“You have to imagine it possible before you can see something. You can have the evidence right in front of you, but if you can’t imagine something that has never existed before, it’s impossible.”

– Rita Dove, first African-American poet laureate of the U.S.

 

“The best protection any woman can have…is courage.”

– Elizabeth Cady Stanton, American abolitionist

 

“Be thankful for what you have; you’ll end up having more. If you concentrate on what you don’t have, you will never, ever have enough.”

– Oprah Winfrey, American media proprietor, talk show host, actress, producer, and philanthropist

 

“The world is wide, and I will not waste my life in friction when it could be turned into momentum.”

– Frances Willard, suffragette whose “momentum” started kindergartens and day care for the children of working women

 

“Every great dream begins with a dreamer. Always remember, you have within you the strength, the patience, and the passion to reach for the stars to change the world.”

– Harriet Tubman, abolitionist, humanitarian, and former slave


Hear Nia Allen sing the beautiful hymn, “Holy Spirit”, at West Angeles Church of God In Christ below:

 

Oprah Photo: Benny Gool/Harpo.

 

 

The American Journey of the Negro National Anthem

At the age of 28, James Weldon Johnson (1871–1938) began to pen a poem which would become one of the most celebrated hymns of all time. Johnson was not only a writer, but also a lawyer, teacher, United States diplomat, and the author of “Lift Every Voice and Sing,” known as the Negro National Anthem. He became the first African-American to pass the bar in the state of Florida, and also served as executive secretary of the NAACP from 1920-1930.

VOICE OF A PEOPLE, SONG OF A NATION

After receiving his bachelor’s and law degrees, Johnson balanced dual careers as educator and lawyer, while also writing poetry. In 1900, at the age of 29, he was asked to speak at an observance at the Florida school where he was principal, but chose to write a piece instead. That piece became what we now know as Lift Every Voice and Sing.

Said James Weldon Johnson –

“A group of young men in Jacksonville, Florida, arranged to celebrate Lincoln’s birthday in 1900. My brother, J. Rosamond Johnson, and I decided to write a song to be sung at the exercises. I wrote the words and he wrote the music. Our New York publisher, Edward B. Marks, made mimeographed copies for us, and the song was taught to and sung by a chorus of five hundred colored school children.

“Shortly afterwards my brother and I moved away from Jacksonville to New York, and the song passed out of our minds. But the school children of Jacksonville kept singing it; they went off to other schools and sang it; they became teachers and taught it to other children. Within twenty years it was being sung over the South and in some other parts of the country. Today the song, popularly known as the Negro National Hymn, is quite generally used.

“The lines of this song repay me in an elation, almost of exquisite anguish, whenever I hear them sung by Negro children.”[1]

 

In 1939, renowned artist Augusta Savage received a commission from the World's Fair for a work of art. She created a 16-foot plaster sculpture titled “The Harp”, which was inspired by “Lift Ev’ry Voice and Sing”. The sounding board of the harp is the arm and hand of God.

In 1939, renowned artist Augusta Savage received a commission from the World’s Fair for a work of art. She created a 16-foot plaster sculpture titled “The Harp”, which was inspired by “Lift Every Voice and Sing”. The sounding board of the harp is the arm and hand of God.

In 1909, the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP) was founded and by 1920, Johnson was appointed as its Executive Secretary. As he worked with the organization to combat racism, lynching, and segregation, the popularity of his anthem began to spread throughout the South. Copies of “Lift Every Voice and Sing” could be found in Black churches across the country, and the NAACP had adopted it as its theme song. It was also during this time that “Negro History Week” (now “Black History Month”) was first celebrated, conceived by noted historian Carter G. Woodson.

According to Harry Henderson and Romare Bearden in A History of African-American Artists (From 1792 to the Present)-

“[Lift Every Voice and Sing] resonates strongly as a Christian hymn because it is a song about exodus. It is a story of a journey sanctified by faith, and protected and prospered by God”[2].

Though the Johnson brothers wrote over 200 songs together (mostly for the stage), this anthem would be their most renowed. Recent historic references to Lift Every Voice include the recitation of its 3rd stanza by Civil Rights leader Reverend Joseph Lowery (formerly president of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference), for his benediction at the inauguration ceremony for President Barack Obama in 2009, and a beautiful performance by noted soprano Denyce Graves at the opening ceremonies of the National Museum of African American History and Culture in Washington, DC in 2016.

Lift Every Voice and Sing continues to serve as inspiration of a people, and an anthem of resilience, hope and faith – not only for African Americans, but also for all Americans who are on the journey to freedom, liberty and justice. 

 

LIFT EVERY VOICE AND SING

Lift every voice and sing,

Till earth and heaven ring,

Ring with the harmonies of Liberty;

Let our rejoicing rise

High as the list’ning skies,

Let it resound loud as the rolling sea.

Sing a song full of the faith that the dark past has taught us,

Sing a song full of the hope that the present has brought us;

Facing the rising sun of our new day begun,

Let us march on till victory is won.

CLICK HERE FOR A PDF OF THE COMPLETE LYRICS. Watch violinist Karen Briggs perform “Lift Every Voice and Sing” at West Angeles Church of God In Christ below:

Read more about The American Journey of Black History Month HERE.

See Dr. Judith McAllister and the West Angeles Mass Choir’s presentation of “We Shall Overcome” HERE.


[1] – Poetry Foundation, “Lift Every Voice and Sing” by James Weldon Johnson. https://www.poetryfoundation.org/poems-and-poets/poems/detail/46549

[2] – Bearden, Romare and Henderson, Harry:  A History of African-American Artists (From 1792 to the Present), Pantheon Books (Random House), 1993, ISBN 0-394-57016-2. Pp. 168-180.

Image of Augusta Savage, courtesy, New York Public Library.