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Introducing: I AM 2018



As we commemorate Dr. King today, let us be reminded not only of his life’s legacy but also of the countless men and women who stood next to him until his very last day 50 years ago.

Today, it is an honor to introduce to you

I AM 2018

 

“I may not get there with you. But I want you to know tonight, that we, as a people, will get to the Promised Land”                            – Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.  

 

The night before he passed, Dr. King spoke these words as he was rallying a group of striking AFSCME sanitation workers and community members in Memphis, telling them to rise up and “make America what it ought to be.”  The worker protests against unfair wages and lackluster safety centered on four iconic words: I AM A MAN. The slogan’s meaning was clear: workers, people of color, and all those marginalized in society deserved to be treated with dignity and respect — as men, as women, and as human beings.

 

This year, on the 50th anniversary of his death, we invite you to join us in

Memphis, Tennessee

April 2 – 4, 2018

We will celebrate Dr. King’s legacy, renew our commitment to his vision, and train future leaders to accelerate our fight for economic justice and civil reform.  Along with COGIC, AFSCME and affiliated religious and community groups and labor organizations, I AM 2018 will send a powerful message of solidarity.

 

-Bishop Charles Edward Blake, Sr., Presiding Bishop and Chief Apostle

 

Register to attend and follow “I AM 2018” for event updates:

BUTTON click here

IAM2018 AFSME

The Extraordinary Life of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. (Video)

Reverend Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. was one of the greatest leaders in world history. Dr. King led a nonviolent movement in the late 1950s-60s, which began in the African American communities of the segregated south. Its purpose was to achieve legal equality and economic justice for all, the effects of which were felt not only in the United States but also worldwide.

“…‘Love your neighbor as yourself.’ All the law and the prophets depend on these two commandments” -Matthew 22:39-40 (NET ) 

Reverend King’s work has transformed the lives of African Americans, women, the poor, and people of other colors and faiths in America, opening the door to greater, unprecedented opportunities for advancement in all areas of life. The purpose of the Civil Rights Movement was to establish the Constitutional and Biblical principles of equality, liberty, and freedom for all in America. Dr. King’s work with the movement ignited and inspired people of other cultures and faiths worldwide in their own struggle for freedom.

 

A timeline of key events in the extraordinary life of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. follows:

 

1929: Born on Jan. 15, 1929, in Atlanta, GA, Martin Luther King was the son, grandson, and great-grandson of Baptist ministers. Named Michael King at birth, King was renamed “Martin” when he was about 6 years old. His father, Martin Luther King Sr., pastor of Ebenezer Baptist Church, and his mother, Alberta (Williams) King, a former schoolteacher, shared the Auburn Avenue home where Dr. King spent his early years with his maternal grandparents, the Rev. Adam Daniel Williams and Jeannie Celeste Williams.

1944-48: King attends Morehouse College, majoring in sociology. Although initially reluctant to follow his calling, Dr. Benjamin Mays, President of Morehouse College, showed him that a religious career could be intellectually satisfying as well as the right foundation with which to pursue the ideals of social change. Dr. King, he was ordained during his final semester at Morehouse.

President Eisenhower meets with civil rights leaders on June 23, 1958. From left to right: the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr., E. Frederic Morrow, Eisenhower, and A. Philip Randolph, William Rogers, and Roy Wilkins. (The Associated Press)

President Eisenhower meets with civil rights leaders on June 23, 1958. (L-R): the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr., E. Frederic Morrow, Eisenhower, A. Philip Randolph, William Rogers, and Roy Wilkins. (AP)during his final semester.

1951: King began doctoral studies in systematic theology at Boston University’s School of Theology. It was during his time in the Boston area where he met and courted Coretta Scott, an Alabama-born Antioch College graduate who was then a student at the New England Conservatory of Music. They married two years later.

1955:  received his doctorate from Crozer Theological Seminary in Chester, PA. He became pastor of the Dexter Avenue Baptist Church in Montgomery, AL, making his first mark on the civil-rights movement by mobilizing the black community during a 382-day boycott of the city’s bus lines. The U.S. Supreme Court ultimately declared bus segregation unconstitutional.

1957: Dr. King laid the groundwork for the organization now known as the Southern Christian Leadership Conference (SCLC). He was elected as its president, and he soon began helping other communities organize their own protests against discrimination.

1963: In Birmingham, AL, during a non-violent protest for fair hiring practices and the desegregation of department-store facilities, police brutality used against the marchers dramatized the plight of blacks to the nation at large. Dr. King was arrested during the protest. He wrote“Letter from a Birmingham Jail” during his imprisonment. He then became a principal speaker at the historic March on Washington, where he delivered one of the most passionate addresses of his career to a multi-racial, multi-cultural crowd, the largest which had ever assembled there on behalf of a common cause in US history. Time magazine designated him as its Person of the Year for 1963.

Alabama State Troopers swing clubs to break up a voter-demonstration march in Selma, Alabama. March 8, 1965. AP wirephoto (Associated Press / )

Troopers swing clubs to break up a voter-demonstration march in Selma, Alabama. March 8, 1965.  (AP)

1964: At 35 years old, Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. became the youngest person to win the Nobel Peace Prize  (see Dr. King’s original notes for his renowned Nobel Prize acceptance speech HERE). In Selma, Ala., he led a voter-registration campaign that ended in the Selma-to-Montgomery Freedom March. King next brought his crusade to Chicago, where he launched programs to rehabilitate the slums and provide housing.

Dr. King rallied behind a new cause: the war in Vietnam. Here, King began to also address poverty, which he saw as a fundamental connection to the cause of the war; students, professors, intellectuals, clergymen, and reformers rushed into the movement as well. He called for a guaranteed family income, he threatened national boycotts, and he spoke of disrupting entire cities by non-violent “camp-ins.” With this in mind, he began to plan a massive March of the Poor on Washington, D.C., envisioning a demonstration of such intensity and size that Congress would have to recognize and deal with the huge number of desperate and downtrodden Americans.

1968: On April 4, 1968, at the age of 39, Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. was assassinated. He was felled by an assassin’s bullet as he stood with Jesse Jackson and Ralph Abernathy on the balcony of the black-owned Lorraine Hotel in Memphis, TN. The hotel is now the site of the National Civil Rights Museum.

1983: Legislation for a Holiday honoring Dr. King was first introduced four days after Dr. King’s assassination. It was signed into law in 1983. He is the only non-president to have a national holiday dedicated in his honor and is the only non-president memorialized on the Great Mall in Washington, DC, our nation’s capital.

 


BELOW: Watch a rarely seen video of Martin Luther King, Jr. speaking to students at Barratt Junior High School in Philadelphia on October 26, 1967, where he delivered his speech “What Is Your Life’s Blueprint?” Many thanks to Beacon Press for posting this video, and to Mr. Rodges Lawton, the student who recorded it back in 1967.

The King Library and Archives in Atlanta is the largest repository of primary source materials on Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. and the American Civil Rights Movement in the world. Significant records which document the social, cultural, economic and political impact of the civil rights movement are housed at the King Library and Archives and are available online. See more at http://www.thekingcenter.org/

Images and quotes, courtesy of The King Center.org. and The Seattle Times (accessed January 15, 2016).  http://www.thekingcenter.org/about-dr-king.

 

 

7 Quotes to Honor The Reverend Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.

The Reverend Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. was one of the greatest leaders in world history. Dr. King led a nonviolent movement in the late 1950’s-60’s to achieve legal equality and economic justice for African Americans in the United States.  Legislation for a Holiday honoring Dr. King was first introduced four days after Dr. King’s assassination, then signed into law in 1983.

 

Today, we honor the legacy and memory of the Reverend Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. with 7 of his quotes  on racism, social change, and nonviolence:

  • “Racism is a philosophy based on a contempt for life…It separates not only bodies, but minds and spirits. Inevitably, it descends to inflicting spiritual and physical homicide upon the out-group.”
  • “We are now faced with the fact that tomorrow is today. We are confronted with the fierce urgency of now…”

  • “Ultimately a great nation is a compassionate nation. No individual or nation can be great if it does not have a concern for ‘the least of these.’” 
  • “A nation that continues year after year to spend more money on military defense [rather] than on programs of social uplift is approaching spiritual death.” 

  • “It is the arrogant assertion that one race is the center of value and object of devotion, before which other races must kneel in submission.” 
  • “I have a dream that my four little children will one day live in a nation where they will not be judged by the color of their skin, but by the content of their character.”

  • “Darkness cannot drive out darkness; only light can do that. Hate cannot drive out hate, only love can do that.”

Image and quotes, courtesy of The King Center.org. (accessed January 17, 2016).  http://www.thekingcenter.org/about-dr-king.  See excerpts from the historic March on Washington below, courtesy of The History Channel.

____________________

The King Library and Archives in Atlanta is the largest repository of primary source materials on Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. and the American Civil Rights Movement in the world. Significant records which document the social, cultural, economic and political impact of the civil rights movement are housed at the King Library and Archives, and are available online. See more at: http://www.thekingcenter.org/

 

 

 

If You Haven’t Heard of Dr. Morris Cerullo, then January 14 is Your Night

Join Us for “Your Los Angeles Night of Miracles”, January 14th

Dr. Morris Cerullo is a world-renowned evangelist and the president of Morris Cerullo World Evangelism.  He has been traveling to the developing nations of the world for over 7 decades. He has ministered in 93 nations, in over 400 cities, and on 7 continents.  He has ministered to millions.

Dr. Cerullo recently was diagnosed with a debilitating incurable disease, but he has experienced a miraculous healing.  He will share his incredible journey here at West Angeles at:

YOUR LOS ANGELES NIGHT OF MIRACLES

SUNDAY, JANUARY 14, 2018, AT 7:00PM

WEST ANGELES CHURCH – NORTH CAMPUS

3045 CRENSHAW BOULEVARD | LOS ANGELES, CA 90016

 

Dr. Morris Cerullo was born in Passaic, New Jersey to a Russo-Jewish/Italian family.  After his parents died tragically in an automobile accident, he was sent to various orphanages. At the age of 14 ½, with the guidance of a nurse in the Jewish Orthodox orphanage where he resided, he gave his life to Christ.

The orphanage directors restricted him from practicing certain matters of his new faith. He ran away and by 15 he was preaching three to four times per week in local churches. He received a scholarship then graduated from the New York Metropolitan Bible School in Suffern, New York (he also holds two honorary doctorates from Florida Beacon College and Oral Roberts University).  By the early 1950s, he was ordained in the Assemblies of God. After eight years of ministry, he went on his first overseas missions trip to Greece, and his international ministry was born.

The Vision to Reach the World

Training Nationals to reach their own people became Dr. Cerullo’s key to reaching the world. He accomplished this goal by conducting Schools of Ministry around the world. Nationals with a heart to learn and lead come to be trained so that they can then go on to impact the lives of others through the ministering of the Gospel of Jesus Christ.

The fruit of Dr. Cerullo’s efforts has circulated the globe.  Here is a brief Timeline of his 70+ years of ministry:

 

  • In 1974, Helpline TV program was developed.
  • In 1976, 80,000 South Africans showed up to witness the miracle-working power of God.
  • In 1977, countless people in India were healed and saved by the all-powerful Word of God.
  • In 1987, an estimated 300,000 French-speaking Africans attended a crusade where more than 50 deaf people were healed.
  • In 1999, over 32 African nations attended a meeting in Lagos, Nigeria.
  • In 2002, Dr. Cerullo established the World Prayer Center in San Diego.
  • In 2014, Dr. Cerullo mobilized 2,000 churches and trained 18,000 Nationals.

 

MCWE provided aid to Ethiopia, medical assistance in East Africa, and helped build multiple orphanages in Mexico.  The Ministry also provides many annual scholarships to up-and-coming Christian students around the world to attend ministry training classes.

Partnering with Tommy and Matthew Barnett, Dr. Cerullo and his wife, Theresa Cerullo built several floors of the Los Angeles Dream Center.  The Center houses 200 women who have come off the streets of Los Angeles and have been freed from drugs, human trafficking, and prostitution.

Dr. Cerullo has received letters of recognition for the work he has done in America and foreign countries, from mayors, presidents, and other governmental leaders. Through his ministry, Dr. Morris Cerullo has seen the Gospel transform nations.

LA Night of Miracles westacogic

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Consecration: 7 Tips for Fasting Success

We’re entering the first week of the annual West Angeles January Consecration! But if you believe that fasting is not for you, or that you can’t get through the month without your favorite foods, then we’re here to help. Read our post below to find out more about the benefits and importance of fasting.

Millions of Christians throughout the world begin the New Year with a period of consecration, extended prayer, known as fasting. When we fast and consecrate ourselves, we do so to bring ourselves closer to God; to cleanse our bodies, to develop discipline, and to prepare ourselves for use for God’s purpose.

Fasting requires us to limit certain foods, beverages, practices, and habits.  It helps to lead us to the physical conditions God wanted for us when He created Adam and Eve (Genesis 1:29); it helps us to manifest the fruit of the Spirit (Galatians 5:22-24), and it develops within us optimum spiritual, mental, and physical functionality (Daniel 1:18-20).

Do you have a tough time starting a fast, or maintaining the eating principles required? Do you want to fast, but you don’t know where to start? If so, then know that you’re not alone.

7 Tips to Consecration Success

Here are 7 tips to help make your time of fasting and consecration a successful one:

  1. Think…It’s for God – and we don’t want to let Him down (Matthew 6:33). Fasting gives us clearer reception to hear God’s voice and enables Him to work in our lives. Fast to create a deeper relationship with God in your relationships, your home, your marriage, your church, and your life.
  2. Do remember…It’s good for you. – Fasting cleanses our bodies from the inside out, and helps us to develop temperance, discipline, and moderation (Daniel 1:8); as a result, it provides us with a healthier lifestyle, better memory, and a better body condition for the healing of both physical and mental afflictions. During your fast, you may also decide to turn off secular media; to clean, de-clutter and organize your home, and to increase prayer and meditation time. Consider everything which enters the body – including intercourse, which you may limit for a time mutually agreed-upon with your spouse (1 Corinthians 7:5).
  3. Do your homework. When we fast, we limit the quantities and types of foods we eat. Fasting returns us to a moderate,quote-fast earth-based foods diet which consists mainly of fruits, vegetables, whole grains, beans, nuts, and spices; and we eliminate artificial and processed foods and drinks; dairy, alcohol, fast foods, sugar, and salt. There are many advances in vegetarian and vegan food preparation these days, so fasting doesn’t restrict you to only celery, carrot sticks, and water!
  4. Be creative! Start by making a list of the healthy foods you like, and begin your fast by limiting your fasting menu and recipes to those items. Use these foods as the foundation to create new recipes, or to alter existing recipes into a healthier version. It is also a great time to try new vegetarian or vegan options. Remember: the use of spices is okay too.
  5. Have only healthy snacks around the house and at work. Replace the chips, sodas, dairy, candy, sweeteners and other sugary items with healthy snacks like nuts, sliced fruits, unsweetened applesauce, figs, and dates.
  6. Juice! Juicing is a great element to add to our diets at any time of the year. A day of juicing can be a healthy, nutrient-filled addition to your year-round eating routine, a good way to increase your fruit and vegetable intake, and a great meal-replacement option. Remember that pureed vegetable soups are “juices” too! Include pureed vegetable soups on days where a fast calls for liquids only, as a warm “green meal”, or an alternative to a salad.  Just be sure to check the ingredients of commercially-made soups though, or make your own.
  7. Drink lots of water. Our bodies are made up of mostly water. When we drink lots of water, it flushes out impurities and helps to re-balance us. It also helps to fill us up and to keep the cravings at bay. Try starting each day of your fast by consuming more water than you usually do; start your morning with at least glass of water. Drink half your body weight in ounces daily; work up to consuming 1 half-gallon of water by noon.

A Final Important Tip to Remember

Often, we don’t want to start a fast because we believe we can’t give up our favorite foods, or we’re afraid that we don’t have the strength or willpower. Sacrificing for God, however, is an important discipline which fasting teaches, and it brings us unparalleled clarity and connection to God.  One thing that’s very important to remember when you’re enduring the rigors of a fast though: you will eat again.  But resuming “normal” eating habits after a fast doesn’t mean going back to consuming the unhealthy foods, drinks, and habits. Start by increasing your intake of foods like applesauce, nuts and pureed juices in your diet, instead of foods loaded with sugar.

When you’ve experienced the difference in your body and mind after clearing out the extra sugar, salt, and even pounds – who knows? It may inspire you to make a permanent change.  And if principles such as heightened awareness, mental transformation, peace, and self-control are important for you to develop in your life, then a consecration is a great place to start.

Allow fasting, consecration, and prayer to inspire you to use moderation as a lifestyle, to break the yoke of bondage to unhealthy habits, and to maintain a clearer connection with God.

FOR FURTHER READING: Genesis 1:29, Exodus 34:28, Leviticus 20:7, Esther 4:16, Joel 2:12-13, Daniel 1:8-14, 10:3; Matthew 6:16-18, 33; Luke 4:2-4. 18:12; Acts 13:2, 14:23; 1 Corinthians 7:5, Galatians 5:16-25.


PLEASE CLICK HERE for the 2018 Consecration Calendar and Guidelines.

TIPS – To increase your daily water intake, drink one glass of water every hour between the time you rise or arrive at work and lunchtime. For example, if you drink a 16-ounce glass or a standard single-serve bottle of water each hour, you could easily drink a half-gallon of water between 9 AM and 12 noon.  Nutrition experts suggest that we drink water before, during, or after our meals instead of juice or sodas. Drinking water before a meal can help curb your appetite too.

REMINDER – Always check the ingredients in commercially prepared foods and juices. Many products which claim to be healthy still add sugar, salt, and other additives.

DISCLAIMER – The information provided on this site is intended for your general knowledge only and is not a substitute for professional medical advice or for treatment of specific medical conditions.  Please consult your doctor or physician before starting any eating plan.

 

Family Time: Christmas Holiday Craft Project

Looking for a meaningful way to spend some of your down time  this Christmas season? Devote it to a Christmas craft project! Crafts are a great way to spend time with loved ones and friends, and it’s also a great way to spend meaningful time with the children in your family.

Ornament-making is a great way to start your own Holiday tradition. Whether you’re spending Christmas with the family, or away from your own loved ones, this is a great activity to take time out to share the Christmas Spirit with those in a women’s shelter or home for the elderly.

 

HAND-MADE CHRISTMAS ORNAMENT
Here’s a project that’s simple and enjoyable to do – and a great way to recycle those special Christmas cards you receive each year by making your own keepsake ornaments.            

WHAT YOU’LL NEED:

  • Six (6) Christmas Cards                             
  • Paper or Craft Glue
  • Scissors
  • Ruler
  • Pencil
  • Compass (or Drinking Glass)
  • Ribbon


1. Gather all supplies.                                                

craft1

2. Using the compass or glass and your pencil, draw a circle around the area on each of your cards you want to use for your ornament. Cut out all six circles.

craft2

3. Using your ruler, draw a square inside of each circle (make sure the corners of the square touch the edge of the circle). Score, and fold upwards along the edges of each square to create a flap (see photo below).

craft3
4. Glue the back of each flap, and attach five of the circles until the ornament takes shape.

craft4
5. Punch a small hole in the center of the sixth circle. Make a loop with the ribbon and knot underneath. Glue top to remaining flaps.

craft5

 

craft6

You can also adorn and personalize your ornaments with family photographs, glitter, crystals, shells, or other special items.  

As it says in Exodus 31:3-5 (NIV)  –

3 “and I have filled him with the Spirit of God, with wisdom, with understanding, with knowledge and with all kinds of skills; 4 to make artistic designs for work in gold, silver and bronze, 5 to cut and set stones, to work in wood, and to engage in all kinds of crafts” 

Working with our hands by engaging in crafts with loved ones or those in need of cheer during the Christmas season can be our own way to bless God.